Author Archives: Rob Archer

Find Your Passion At Work! (Just Don’t Expect to Feel Passionate About It When You Do)

One of the reasons I left consultancy is because I felt that the work was meaningless.  In meetings I would try not to fall asleep as people droned on about project dependencies and stakeholder management and at the weekend all … Continue reading

Posted in Acceptance and Commitment Training (ACT), Behaviour change, Careers, Meaning, Values, Work | 5 Comments

Psychological Flexibility in Difficult Conversations

It struck me that psychological flexibility is very powerful in relationships, and particularly in having difficult conversations.  However, this is something I rarely talk about on this blog (Rachel maybe more so).  So I thought sharing a personal example of … Continue reading

Posted in Acceptance and Commitment Training (ACT), Behaviour change, Values | 1 Comment

Why Happiness Makes Me Grumpy (aka: The Limitations of Aiming for a Happy Workplace)

Most serious positive psychology researchers would agree with the idea that happiness should not be an objective.   But in my experience the message gets lost in translation, certainly among the many life coaches and pop psychologists who advocate the implementation … Continue reading

Posted in Acceptance and Commitment Training (ACT), Behaviour change, Psychological Flexibility | Tagged , , | 11 Comments

Why Psychological Flexibility Will be a Key Leadership Skill of the Future

Last year in the UK, a Panorama investigation uncovered systematic abuse of elderly care home residents who were ­being routinely pushed about, belittled and ­humiliated by their so-called carers. Worse, when whistleblowers drew attention to the abuse it was they … Continue reading

Posted in Acceptance and Commitment Training (ACT), Behaviour change, Psychological Flexibility, Relationships / communication, Values, Work | Tagged | 2 Comments

What it Feels Like to Make a Mistake

I don’t like making mistakes.  In fact most of my professional life has been spent in the service of not making a mistake, or being seen not to. I am not alone; in fact a lot of the practical difficulty … Continue reading

Posted in Acceptance and Commitment Training (ACT), Behaviour change, Relationships / communication | 6 Comments

A Summer of Defying Labels

This gallery contains 36 photos.

Today the Paralympics end and I’ve been reflecting what it has all meant to me. One of the major themes has been about the Olympics’ capacity to defy labels.  Labels can be useful to help us understand things and give … Continue reading

Gallery | 3 Comments

Why The Olympics Matter

Of course, sport doesn’t really matter.  Sport isn’t life and death.  It isn’t war.  Yet at the same time, for all the negative focus by the media before the games, the Olympics do matter. The key to understanding the Olympics … Continue reading

Posted in Psychological Flexibility | 1 Comment

What The Olympic Opening Ceremony Meant To Me

Be not afeard. The isle is full of noises. How to top Beijing?  That was the question that rang in the air prior to the event.  It seemed impossible, such was the unified precision, power and purpose of China’s message … Continue reading

Posted in Acceptance and Commitment Training (ACT), Meaning, Psychological Flexibility, Values | Leave a comment

Collaboration

I live a controlled life.  I live by myself, work for myself and please myself most of the time.  I’ve done this all my life, having learned to retreat into my room and fix my own problems from a very … Continue reading

Posted in Psychological Flexibility, Values | 2 Comments

Using ACT in Career Change

Why do bright, motivated people get stuck in their careers? I’ve spent the last 10 years or so thinking about the issue and working with people who are stuck in this way. I write about this in my other blog, … Continue reading

Posted in Acceptance and Commitment Training (ACT), Careers, Decision making, Meaning, Mindfulness, Organisations and careers, Psychological Flexibility, Values, Work | Leave a comment